Hairstyles Ideas

1950’s Hairstyles

1950's hairstyles 1

1950's Hairstyles

Hairstyles for women in the 1950s were diverse, of varying hair lengths, although women older than 20 generally preferred short to medium-length hair. Women generally emulated the hair styles and hair colors of popular film personalities and fashion magazines; top models played a pivotal role in propagating the styles. Alexandre of Paris had developed the beehive and artichoke styles seen on Grace Kelly, Jackie Kennedy, the Duchess of Windsor, Elizabeth Taylor, and Tippi Hedren. Generally, a shorter bouffant style was favored by female movie stars, paving the way for the long hair trend of the 1960s. Very short cropped hairstyles were fashionable in the early 1950s. By mid-decade, hats were worn less frequently, especially as fuller hairstyles like the short, curly “elfin cut” or the “Italian cut” or “poodle cut” and later the bouffant and the beehive became fashionable (sometimes nicknamed B-52s for their similarity to the bulbous noses of the B-52 Stratofortress bomber). Stars such as Marilyn Monroe, Connie Francis, Elizabeth Taylor and Audrey Hepburn usually wore their hair short with high volume. In the poodle hairstyle, the hair is permed into tight curls, similar to the poodle’s curly hair (curling the hair involves time and effort). This style was popularized by Hollywood actresses like Peggy Garner, Lucille Ball, Ann Sothern and Faye Emerson. In the post-war prosperous 1950s, in particular, the bouffant hair style was the most dramatic and considered an ideal style in which aerosol hairspray facilitated keeping large quantities of “backcombed or teased and frozen hair” in place. This necessitated a regimen of daily hair care to keep the bouffant in place; curlers were worn to bed and frequent visits were made to the hair stylist’s salon. Mouseketeer Annette Funicello dramatically presented this hair style in the movie “Beach Party”.
1950's hairstyles 1

1950's Hairstyles

This was a great article. I love doing my own hair. I have perm medium length black hair. I love updos from the 1950. I love Dorothy Dandruff cut it is similar to Elizabeth Taylor 1950s look. I love putting hair in French roll. I love hair pieces especially for Christmas party, easter, wedding, formal weddings. I love wigs. In 1950 you also saw head bangs, starts, flowers and brooches
1950's hairstyles 2

1950's Hairstyles

The 1950s was a decade known for experimentation with new styles and culture. Following World War II and the austerity years of the post-war period, the 1950s were a time of comparative prosperity, which influenced fashion and the concept of glamour. Hairstylists invented new hairstyles for wealthy patrons. Influential hairstylists of the period include Sydney Guilaroff, Alexandre of Paris and Raymond Bessone who took French hair fashion to the Hollywood, New York and London, popularising the pickle cut, the pixie cut and bouffant hairstyles.
1950's hairstyles 3

1950's Hairstyles

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then the ladies above say it all. 1950s fashion – hairstyles were soft and curly. Straight hair was out. Short hair was in.Young women often tied their hair back in a ponytail and circled it with a pretty chiffon scarf. But this would have been for casual activities and rarely for evening.The Fifties look was usually achieved by an arduous process of pin curling and rolling. Remember – no blow dryers in the 50s. As demonstrated by super model Suzy Parker, one pinned the hair and sometimes sprayed it to keep the set.And yes, we actually slept in curlers and rollers. Don’t ask me how because I don’t remember. Denial is a wonderful thing.Universal-International Studios released the drawing at left so you could replicate Sandra Dee’s 1959 look, at right.All you need is several sizes of rollers, some pin curlers and the patience of Job.Hair dryer not included.Even with all the curling sometimes a perm (permanent wave) was required. Many of us dutifully sat in the kitchen while Mom annoited our hair with the ghastly smelling solutions. And asked repeatedly, “is it time yet.” Time that is, to rinse it out!Ever ready to suffer for the cause of soft feminine looking Fifties styles, after the perm, we still had to roll, curl our hair. Why? Because the natural, unfettered curl look of today would have seemed wild and unruly back then.The poodle frenzy of the Fifties gave birth to a hairstyle – namely, the poodle cut. No better example can be found than the hair of Lucille Ball.Visit the I Love Lucy pages!
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1950's Hairstyles

The American film industry, and popular music industry influenced hairstyles around the world, both in mainstream fashion and teenage sub-culture. With the advent of the rock music industry, teenage culture, and teenage fashion became increasingly significant and distinctive from mainstream fashion, with American style being imitated in Europe, Asia, Australasia and South America. Teenage girls across the world wore their hair in ponytails while teenage boys wore crew cuts, and the more rebellious favoured “greaser” comb-backs.

1950's Hairstyles

The development of hair-styling products, particularly setting sprays, hair-oil and hair-cream, influenced the way in which hair was styled, and the way in which people across the world wore their hair, from day to day. Women’s hair styles of the 1950s were in general less ornate and more informal than those of the 1940s, with a “natural” look being favoured, even if it was achieved by perming, setting, styling and spraying. Mature men’s hairstyles were always short and neat, and generally maintained with hair-oil. Even among “rebellious youth” with longer greased hair, carrying a comb and maintaining the hairstyle was part of the culture.
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1950's Hairstyles

Popular music and film stars had a major influence on 1950s hairstyles and fashion. Elvis Presley and James Dean had a great influence on the high quiff-pompadour greased-up style or slicked-back style for men with heavy use of Brylcreem or pomade. The pompadour was a fashion trend in the 1950s, especially among male rockabilly artists and actors. A variation of this was the duck’s ass (or in the UK “duck’s arse”), also called the “duck’s tail”, the “ducktail”, or simply the D.A. This hairstyle was originally developed by Joe Cerello in 1940. Cerello’s clients later included film celebrities like Elvis Presley and James Dean. Frank Sinatra posed in a modified D.A. style of hair. This style required that the hair be combed back around the sides of the head. The tooth edge of a comb was then used to define a central part running from the crown to the nape at the back of the head, resembling, to many, the rear end of a duck. The hair on the top front of the head was either deliberately disarrayed so that untidy strands hung down over the forehead, or combed up and then curled down into an “elephant’s trunk” which might hang down as far as the top of the nose. The sides were styled to resemble the folded wings of the duck, often with heavy sideburns. A variant of the duck’s tail style, known as “the Detroit”, consisted of the long back and sides combined with a flattop. In California, the top hair was allowed to grow longer and combed into a wavelike pompadour shape known as a “breaker”. The duck’s tail became an emblematic coiffure of disaffected young males across the English-speaking world during the 1950s, a sign of rebellious youth and of a “bad boy” image. The style was frowned upon by high school authorities, who often imposed limitations on male hair length as part of their dress codes. Nevertheless, the style was widely copied by men of all ages.
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1950's Hairstyles

Jacqueline Kennedy wore a short hair style for her wedding in 1953, while later she sported a “bouffant”; together with the larger beehive and shorter bubble cut, this became one of the most popular women’s hairstyles of the 1950s. Grace Kelly favored a mid-length bob style, also influential. There were exceptions, however, and some women, such as Bettie Page, favored long, straight dark locks and a fringe; such women were known as “Beat girls”. In the mid-1950s, a high ponytail became popular with teenage girls, often tied with a scarf. The ponytail was seen on the first Barbie dolls, in 1959; a few years later Barbies with beehives appeared. The “artichoke cut”, which was invented by Jacques Dessange, was specially designed for Brigitte Bardot. Compact coiffures were popular in the 1950s as less importance was given to hairstyling, although a new look was stylized by Christian Dior’s fashion revolution after the war.
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The 1950s were an enormously influential decade for American style, and 1950s hairstyles shifted accordingly. Post-WWII, the US was rebuilding its economy and moving (haltingly and often painfully) towards social change. The dynamism and simultaneous retreat to more conservative times are both apparent in the era’s styles, which veer wildly from rockabilly hair to pixie cuts and primly waved bobs. It was a time of great change and style to match, so check out some of the decade’s most prominent highlights.
1950's hairstyles 9

The 1950s were an enormously influential decade for American style, and 1950s hairstyles shifted accordingly. Post-WWII, the US was rebuilding its economy and moving (haltingly and often painfully) towards social change. The dynamism and simultaneous retreat to more conservative times are both apparent in the era’s styles, which veer wildly from rockabilly hair to pixie cuts and primly waved bobs. It was a time of great change and style to match, so check out some of the decade’s most prominent highlights. Source: 20th Century Fox, Corbis Images

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